Queen's Royal Lancers Regiment

 


[ Trooper Robert Pearson ]

Queen's Royal Lancers Regiment

Trooper Robert Pearson ... killed in Afghanistan, Monday 21 April 2008. Trooper Robert "Chesney" Pearson At approximately 0900hrs local time, Trooper Pearson was part of the Armoured Support Company Royal Marines who were providing security to a re-supply convoy that was returning to Camp Bastion when the vehicle he was driving hit a suspected mine. Sadly, despite the best efforts of the medical team, Trooper Pearson was pronounced dead on arrival at the field hospital at Camp Bastion. Another soldier was injured in the blast and he is currently still receiving medical treatment.

Mourners lined the streets and threw flowers in front of the hearse, as a mark of respect to Trooper Pearson.


Trooper Robert "Chesney" Pearson, 22, from Grimsby, joined his local regiment, The Queen's Royal Lancers, in early 2007 where he became the driver of a Scimitar Reconnaissance vehicle. He was posted to A Squadron where he took part in Pre-Deployment Training in Viking all-terrain vehicles. He deployed to Afghanistan in January 2008 as part of the Armoured Support Company Royal Marines in support of 52 Infantry Brigade.  Throughout his training and despite his youth and relative inexperience his potential had already been noted. Trooper Pearson leaves behind his father Paul, stepmother Gillian, and sisters Terrie, Alex and Alivia. "Trooper Robert Pearson had only served with The Queen's Royal Lancers for just over a year since completing his training; yet, despite this, he had already made a name for himself in his Squadron where he was a popular and well respected individual. "Trooper Pearson took a keen and professional interest in his job as a Formation Reconnaissance soldier; his outgoing and confident manner giving a strong indication to his chain of command that he was a talent to watch. For those that might question whether or not today's soldiers are a match for their forebears he was ample proof that they are every bit as good and more. The Lancers have lost a good soldier today but our loss, whilst great, is nothing compared to that felt by his family and our thoughts are with them at this difficult time." Major Jez Stemp, Company Commander of Armoured Support Company Royal Marines said: "Trooper Robert Pearson made an immediate impact on his arrival in Afghanistan, quickly demonstrating his abilities as both a highly professional soldier, and a gifted Viking operator. He was an asset to both the Troop and Company alike, and quickly proved to be a courageous and respected member of the team. Trooper Pearson, or 'Chesney' as he was universally known, typically wanted to be involved in everything, and always approached any task with a smile. His relaxed and amiable personality were matched with a good sense of humor and a love of his favored football team, Blackburn. "During the various operations conducted by 3 Troop, Armoured Support Company, he was always to be found in the thick of the action and seemed to thrive in the exceptionally difficult challenges of operating in Afghanistan. He was an immensely professional soldier who impressed his Royal Marine colleagues and superiors alike. Trooper Pearson was a bright star who had a great future ahead of him – he never feared a challenge.  "His death has come as a tremendous shock to his friends and colleagues, and he will be dearly missed by his comrades in the Armoured Support Company and the Queen's Royal Lancers. Our thoughts are with his family and loved ones during this difficult time." His Squadron Leader Major Khashi Sharifi said: "As a soldier Trooper Pearson could not be faulted. Despite his relative inexperience he always maintained a thoroughly professional approach: he worked hard, was faultless in support of his friends and demonstrated a real eagerness to extend the bounds of his professional knowledge. It was typical of both his approach to soldiering and his desire to experience all that life had to offer that he volunteered to deploy early to Afghanistan with 3 Troop and further proposed extending in theatre to, 'look after' his old Troop Sergeant. In short he had a bright future which was cruelly cut short." Sergeant "Jay" South Queen's Royal Lancers, of Armoured Support Company, said: "Trooper 'Chesney' Pearson was a keen and happy soldier who always went out on the job with a huge smile. A popular member of A Squadron QRL, he loved going out with his friends and could often be found in fancy dress. He was full of life. He always performed well and achieved high grades on any course. Trooper Pearson was an asset to any troop and did well at whatever he did. He will be sadly missed." Corporal Allen Queen's Royal Lancers, of Armoured Support Company, said: "After he joined he was thrown straight into the thick of the action on an exercise on Salisbury Plain – that's where he got his nickname, 'Chesney', due to his likeliness to the Coronation Street character. He was a keen bloke who always the first to volunteer. Pushing for promotion, he was the kind of person you want and need in your troop." Lance Corporal "Fed" Baldwin of A Squadron, Queen's Royal Lancers, said: "'Chesney' was a good mate of mine. He always had a word to say and a strong opinion. He kept his head low when he got to the Regiment and soon earned a good reputation as a hard worker. 'Chesney' had a tough year with his Mother passing away, but he soon picked himself up and returned to work back to his normal self. In my eyes for that he has my utmost respect for his integrity and strength. "He will be sorely missed by myself and all of The Queen's Royal Lancers, in particular 1 Troop, A Squadron with whom he spent the last year of his life working. 'Chesney', rest in peace mate, wherever your soul may lay." Lieutenant Duncan Bam said: "He was greatly admired for his 'hands on' work ethos and esprit de corps - as many in the Squadron would reflect one could not hope for a more loyal friend. 'Chesney' was whole-heartedly committed to his job and showed a selfless commitment both at work and play.  "Trooper Pearson will be sorely missed by his many friends within the Squadron; we share in his family's sadness at his tragically early death and our heartfelt condolences are with his family."


[ Trooper Andrew Martin Howarth ]

Trooper Andrew Martin Howarth of Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers, was killed in Afghanistan on Saturday 18 September 2010. Trooper Howarth was killed in action during a vehicle patrol in the Bolan district of Lashkar Gah in Helmand province alongside one of his colleagues. Trooper Andrew Martin Howarth was born in Bournemouth on 28 May 1990. He attended Queen Elizabeth's School in Wimborne, Dorset, before joining the Army in 2007. He completed basic training at the Army Training Regiment, Bassingbourn, before passing out of Royal Armoured Corps Phase 2 training at Bovington. He joined The Queen's Royal Lancers in Catterick, North Yorkshire, in February of 2008, and in doing so became the third generation of his family to serve with the Regiment. Trooper Howarth has spent the duration of his career in C Squadron, as a reconnaissance vehicle driver. He was exceptionally gifted at maintaining and managing the armoured vehicles under his stewardship and was chosen from amongst his peers to drive for his troop leader. He showed his true abilities from the start, driving for his troop leader on training exercises on Salisbury Plain Training Area, during Exercise MEDICINE MAN in BATUS in the summer of 2009, throughout Mission Specific Training for Op HERRICK 12, and on the deployment to Afghanistan in April 2010. His initiative, self motivation and robustness, both physical and mental, were exceptional in a soldier of such youth and inexperience; he would have, without doubt, risen through the ranks above and beyond his peers. He had an infectious smile and a truly inspirational sense of humour.  Aside from his life as a professional formation reconnaissance soldier, Trooper Howarth was an immensely charismatic young sportsman. He has a deep rooted love of rugby football and represented the Regimental side on many an occasions. He was also an avid alpine skier, having learnt to ski with the Regimental Alpine Ski Team in Verbier, Switzerland in 2008; although he was only a beginner, his enthusiasm, absolute courage and determination easily compensated for his lack of experience on the slopes. Trooper Howarth was killed in action during a vehicle patrol in the Bolan district of Lashkar Gah on 18 September 2010 alongside one of his colleagues. He was serving as part of Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers, and was providing security to the people of Helmand Province, during a vehicle mounted ground domination patrol, by denying insurgents' freedom of movement. He leaves behind his parents, John and Sarah, and his older brother Marcus.

 

Trooper Howarth's family said: "He was a very loving son who loved his family and friends, he would light up any room when he walked in and would do anything for anyone. He had a heart of Gold and will be deeply missed. "He was proud to serve his country. He quoted before he left for Afghanistan 'We give our today so you can have your tomorrow'. Lieutenant Colonel Martin Todd, Commanding Officer, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Andy Howarth was a young man of irrepressible enthusiasm, determination and good humour. He was the perfect reconnaissance soldier: quick-witted, physically robust and as skilled dismounted as he was on vehicles of all types. "He was a true son of the Regiment, son, nephew and grandson of former Lancers, and he wore the ‘motto' with unrestrained pride. He crammed an enormous amount into his time with the Regiment: skiing, playing rugby and football, as well as making scores of close friends. Their tributes to him burst with the affection and respect in which he was held by all ranks. "He died amongst his friends in a noble cause, serving his Regiment and his country, while protecting the Afghan people. Our hearts go out to his parents, John and Sarah, and his brother, Marcus. We can only share in their intense pride in him and their unutterable grief at his loss." Lieutenant Colonel Lincoln Jopp, Commanding Officer, Combined Force Lashkar Gah said: "All of us in Combined Force Lashkar Gah have been deeply struck by the awful death of Trooper Andy Howarth. A stalwart of Fondouk Squadron, he was a tremendous character who had made an impact well beyond the Squadron. He died on patrol thwarting the insurgents and protecting the people of the southern Bolan area, providing the freedom for local nationals to go about their daily lives. "It was vital work and he was doing it brilliantly. The whole of the Scots Guards Battlegroup, every man and woman, join me in sending our deepest and most sincere condolences to Andy's parents and brother. Their grief must be immeasurable and we grieve with them. We Honour our Fallen." Major Ben Cossens, Officer Commanding, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "During the short period of time I had the privilege of commanding Trooper Howarth, he made a deep impression on me. "His verve, enthusiasm for life and incessant smile will remain with me indefinitely. "He was an excellent soldier, able to find humour in the darkest of places and situations and never one to abandon a task. He was unquestionably robust, professional and utterly selfless in everything he did. It is cruelly fitting that he be killed in action, protecting the people of Afghanistan from the tyranny and repression of the Taliban. "It is an absolute tragedy that such a fine man should be taken from us so early. The thoughts and prayers of everyone in Fondouk Squadron are with Trooper Andy Howarth's parents John and Sarah, and his older brother Marcus. "Our lives are richer for having known him; he will always be remembered. Major Jim Walker, formerly Officer Commanding, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Howarth had been with the Squadron all throughout our training in Canada and through to deployment to Afghanistan. "Although still a young man, we watched him develop through his training and he showed in Afghanistan the fearlessness to be the point man on foot patrols. "He knew his business and worked hard to support his Troop. Nicknamed ‘Steptoe' for his natural and endearing scruffiness, he was perfectly placed and comfortably at home in First Troop. Always ready with a smile, he approached life on operations with enthusiasm and dedication to his fellows. "He was impressively fit and especially loved playing football and rugby, I'll remember him as part of the Squadron's victorious rugby team, complete with socks around his ankles and a smile on his muddy face. A stalwart soldier, tough and enthusiastic, he will be profoundly missed, but always remembered." Captain Will Pope, Second-in-Command, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Howarth had been serving with The Queen's Royal Lancers for over a year when I first met him. It was clear immediately that he was a massive character who was adored by both his fellow Troopers and those that had the pleasure of commanding him. "When the Squadron gathered it would inevitably be the case that Trooper Howarth would be in the middle of the biggest cluster of Troopers, leading the jokes and finding the funny side of even the most dire of situations. "In Afghanistan I would inevitably see Steptoe, as everyone knew him, when he would come into Squadron HQ at the end of his Troop's patrols. "He always seemed to try and carry at least three loads of batteries on his own, so his exhausted comrades were able to relax while he put them on to recharge. Inevitably dropping a couple on his way in, he would be drenched in sweat and grime, utterly fatigued but still able to push out a broad grin and a cheeky quip which would never fail to raise spirits in the Operations Room. "He was a first rate soldier and an excellent friend to all that knew him. We share in his family's loss for the death of a truly inspirational young man." Captain Ollie Thornton-Flowers, Intelligence Officer, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Howarth was one of those men that everyone knew in the Squadron. He was fought over by vehicle commanders within his Troop for his excellent driving skills. His professional nature was often hidden behind his place in the squadron as a joker. "I believe that through all the training and the hard times in Afghanistan I never saw him without his trademark smile. "His career was destined for greatness but cut so very short by this tragic event. He will never be forgotten and his place never filled. "His parents John and Sarah and brother Marcus are in my thoughts at this sad time."  Lieutenant Johnny Clayton, 1st Troop Leader, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Howarth and I had served in the Army for about the same length of time and we have been part of the same troop since I first arrived at the Regiment. "During this time I have had the pleasure of working and serving with a soldier who cared deeply about his job and also got to know a young man with an infectious good nature and lust for life. "Never the smartest turned out soldier, Andrew was always found grinning widest when completely covered in oil, dust or whatever the practical side of his job found him working with. "He would always be the first on a dance floor or, in the absence of one, would sometimes just dance and have a laugh wherever he was. His smile was a near permanent fixture and he had the ability to make everyone around him laugh. "He died doing something he enjoyed, working with his brother-in-arms. He has left a void that will not be filled and I will miss him very much." Lieutenant Rob Campbell, 2nd Troop Leader, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Howarth: Quiet, hardworking and smiling, always smiling." Warrant Officer Class 1 (Regimental Sergeant Major) Leon Mattear, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "I first met Trooper Howarth in February 2008 when as a new recruit his father personally delivered him to C Squadron from Phase 2 training. "He was an immensely likeable young man, a keen rugby player and a dedicated member of the Regimental rugby team. This sad loss will be felt hugely by all those in Fondouk Squadron and in particular his close friends and peers. My sincerest condolences go to his family at this tragic time." Warrant Officer Class (Squadron Sergeant Major ) Tony Gould, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Andy ‘Steptoe' Howarth was a born entertainer and brought humour to whatever he did. Seeing Steptoe grow into a vehicle expert and reconnaissance soldier was amazing and made me a very proud Squadron Sergeant Major. His jokes and enthusiasm for dance music was infectious. "He would often ask if he could spin his famous decks during room inspections. Unfortunately we did not all share his love for hard techno house music. I am proud to have watched Steptoe grow and strive for perfection. "Trooper Andy Howarth rest now, and play your music loud and proud, as your pain has gone. Thank you, Steptoe, you are gone, but will never be forgotten." Staff Sergeant (Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant) Tony Round, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Andrew Howarth (Steptoe) was an extremely skilled trooper; he gave his heart and soul to the Regiment, and would staunchly defend his fellow soldiers in all situations, whether on operations or at home. "While Trooper Howarth was soft spoken by nature, it was all too often the case to hear his beloved drum and bass thumping from his car as he drove through camp. "He will be sadly missed by all who have served with him or knew him. Brother, Rest in Peace." Lance Corporal James Bowers and Trooper Michael Pannell, 1st Troop, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Andy was one of my best friends. He was one of the most outgoing people I've ever met and was always full of life; he could often be found sitting in the common room with a beer in his hand ready for a party on the weekend. "Even in the most testing of times he would still be smiling from ear to ear, especially when no one else was. "He would do anything to help someone in need. His absence is a hole that can never be filled. He was a true friend in every sense of the word. "We will miss him and he will never be forgotten." Trooper Brett Armstrong, 1st Troop, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Trooper Howarth, aka Steptoe, was an amazing asset to the Squadron and also his Troop. "He was a keen soldier and was determined to complete his snipers course once back in the Regiment after the tour. He was the highlight of the day for the people who knew him best, always dancing and cracking jokes. "He will be missed; each day he will be remembered and kept in our hearts. Our love goes out to Trooper Howarth's friends and his family who have suffered a great loss. There was no doubt that he would have fulfilled his dreams, he was a Lancer through and through and will be deeply missed by all soldiers in the Regiment. "Steptoe was a keen DJ and loved drum and bass, he was never down, always a happy person even when things were rough. For example on exercise on Salisbury Plain we had been up all night dismounted and the rain had been pouring all night. "We had a few hours waiting for the coach the next morning back in camp. Everyone was down and depressed because they were wet and cold. But there was Steptoe in the middle of us all dancing away to his tunes on his iPod without a care in the world. He knew for a fact that he couldn't dance but he didn't care, as long as he made people laugh then he was happy. And that is the kind of memory that will be remembered for years to come.  Trooper Craig Smith, 2nd Troop, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Andy was one of my best friends. He had a way of making everything fun and bad things ok. He had a gift that allowed him to approach any situation with confidence and bravery. He passed this on to all those around him through presence and humour. "Both in his professional and private life, Andy and I did it all together: nights out, football matches and Sunday lunches, with his family and mine. "These moments I am honoured to have had and I will treasure eternally. Andy leaves behind a Squadron's worth of friends who respected and loved him. We could all turn to him in times of need as I knew I could. My thoughts and heart go out to his family. "I will always miss you and always remember you with respect and love. Goodbye mucker." Trooper Ian Baird, 2nd Troop, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Steptoe was always fun to be around and he was able to bring a big smile to your face in any situation or go the totally opposite way and drive you insane; that is what brothers in arms do.  "He was a totally unbelievable friend, with more loyalty to the people he loved than many others I have seen. I know he had a lot of love for his family. "As a 3rd generation Lancer, we knew his Dad was his hero; he was a sensitive soul and loved his mother like no other. "Marcus, his brother, was the apple of his eye. I remember just before we came out here, Marcus was coming up to camp and Steptoe was so excited about being able to bring his two worlds together. He loved having his friends and family around him and would do almost anything for them; just as we would for him. "Goodbye Steptoe; you will always be with us."  Trooper Kieran Dawson, 3rd Troop, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "It is so sad to see you go but I am sure you have gone to a better place. I will always cherish the good times we had. You were always a good friend to me and others. "You will be sadly missed and you will always be in my memories, thoughts and heart." "Rest in Peace, Love Dawson."


[ Sergeant Andrew James Jones ]

Sergeant Andrew James Jones of the Royal Engineers was killed in Afghanistan on Saturday 18 September 2010. Sergeant Jones was killed in action during a vehicle patrol in the Bolan district of Lashkar Gah alongside one of his colleagues. He was serving as part of Fondouk Squadron, the Queen's Royal Lancers, and was providing security to the people of Helmand Province, during a vehicle mounted ground domination patrol, by denying insurgents' freedom of movement Sergeant Andrew James Jones was born in Newport, South Wales on 08 January 1975, and attended Lliswerry Comprehensive School before choosing to join the Royal Engineers He completed basic training at the Army Training Regiment, Bassingbourn in February of 1998, before passing out of the Royal Engineers Combat Engineering Course in August of the same year. He deployed to Kosovo with 31 Armoured Engineer Squadron (AES), 32 Engineer Regiment, before being posted to the Royal Engineers Armoured Trials and Development Unit in Bovington Camp, Dorset. After this posting Sergeant Jones was posted to D Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers as an Engineer Reconnaissance Troop Sergeant in February 2009. His service with D Squadron saw him conducting demolition ranges in Scotland, leading a team over the Yorkshire 3 Peaks in 24 hours and overseeing the site reconnaissance and placing of bridges for the Queen's Royal Lancer's Battle Group in BATUS, Canada in 2009. For the deployment to Afghanistan in 2010, he was placed in 1st Troop, Fondouk Squadron, and immediately made a name for himself as a tirelessly efficient, sharp witted and boundlessly enthusiastic individual; his performance on Operation HERRICK 12 was second-to-none. Sergeant Jones was quick to fit into Regimental life in Catterick; his sense of humour and dulcet Welsh accent made him popular with the troops and in the Warrant Officers' and Sergeants' Mess. An avid supporter of the Welsh Rugby Team, he was never more at home than when arguing over a referee's decision in a test match against England. Above all, Sergeant Jones was a family man. He spoke endlessly of his wife Joanne, and children, Natasha, Caitlin and Liam, and of his plans for the future. While his professional focus was unquestioned, his heart remained with his family for the duration of his tour in Afghanistan.

 

Sergeant Jones' wife, Joanne, said: "Andrew was a happy, funny and caring man. He was a loving husband, father and son, and he will leave a gaping hole in our lives." Lieutenant Colonel Martin Todd MBE, Commanding Officer, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Sergeant Andrew Jones had been attached to The Queen's Royal Lancers for 18 months, during which time he gained a peerless reputation as a tough, resolute soldier and leader. "He was in every way an outstanding representative of the Royal Engineers in whom he displayed an abiding pride. He brought their strong professional ethos and a wide range of specialist skills to our ranks. "In Afghanistan he was always to the fore, particularly when his engineering skills and experience were called for in clearing safe passages for men and vehicles. His courage and good-humoured leadership inspired all those in his Troop, particularly when the going was hard. "He died serving his Corps and country, while protecting ordinary Afghans A proud Welshman, who exhibited all the fortitude of his countrymen, he was at heart a devoted family man. "The anguish of his wife, Joanne, and their three children is impossible for us to fathom. We can only express our profound sorrow as we share in their grievous loss." Lieutenant Colonel Lincoln Jopp MC, Commanding Officer, Combined Force Lashkar Gah said: "All of us in Combined Force Lashkar Gah have been deeply struck by the deaths of Sergeant Andrew Jones and Trooper Andy Howarth. Both were stalwarts of Fondouk Squadron and both were tremendous characters who had made an impact well beyond the Squadron. "They died on patrol thwarting the insurgents and protecting the people of the southern Bolan area, providing the freedom for local nationals to go about their daily lives. It was vital work and both men were doing it brilliantly. The whole of the Scots Guards Battlegroup, every man and woman, join me in sending our deepest and most sincere condolences to Andrew's wife and three children, and the families of both men. Their grief must be immeasurable and we grieve with them. We Honour our Fallen." Major Ben Cossens, Officer Commanding Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "In the short time that I knew Sergeant Jones, he made a lasting impression on me. He was a tremendous soldier and a tireless and committed engineer. "He was excellent fun and was able to draw a smile during even the most sombre periods over the last few weeks. He was an absolutely essential part of my team and will be sorely missed. "The thoughts and prayers of everyone in Fondouk Squadron are with Sergeant Jones' wife Joanne and children Natasha, Caitlin and Liam. Our lives are richer for having known him; he will always be remembered." Major Jim Walker, formerly Officer Commanding Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Sergeant Andy Jones was a specialist, a Reconnaissance Engineer embedded with the Squadron, but he was an important part of the team and an integral part of First Troop. "A proud Welshman and dedicated father, he was charming and methodical. He had an eye for detail, often noticing the incongruous and reporting it back, protecting his troop and the Afghan People.  "His Engineer skills were first class, submitting some comprehensive reports, always showing high standards and calling for the same from those in his Corps. "His efforts made life for the boys better and improved their day to day life. He loved his time with the Squadron and was keen to remain with the Regiment as long as possible. "He was a trusted comrade and a truly valued friend. He gave his life doing the job he loved and protecting the Afghan people and he will be remembered as a loving father and a truly gentle man." Captain Will Pope, Second-in-Command, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "I first met Sergeant Jones when I began the role of Squadron Second-in-Command back in September last year. "The formation of a new Squadron in the midst of build up training for Afghanistan was a particularly hectic time for all of us, but Sergeant Jones had an admirable ability of being able to take absolutely anything I threw at him in his stride. "He had the respect and admiration of all those under his command and rapidly earned the trust of all those in the chain of command above him. "His appearance at the office door and his soft Welsh accent would inevitably be there to inform me of an impending possible drama which he had already sorted and implemented a plan to resolve, or some brilliant method in which to improve the training on offer to the boys in the Squadron. I valued his opinion highly. "Here in Afghanistan, he continued on exactly the same, highly impressive path. "A broad grin never far from breaking out, he got involved in everything he could and seemed totally unflappable. "His dedication to his Troop was only exceeded by the love he held for his family. His wife, Joanne and his three children meant the world to him; he was so excited by the prospect of getting home to see them. "Sergeant Jones was a great man, he was an incredible ambassador for the Royal Engineers who he represented brilliantly. Our thoughts and our prayers are with his family at this difficult time." Captain Ollie Thornton-Flowers, Intelligence Officer, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Sergeant Jones was a husband, father and Sapper. Although on attachment to the Regiment he was someone that you would want in your Troop. "He was the most professional Sergeant I have known, with a natural ability to turn his hand to anything. A Welshman, and we all knew it, I thank him for never holding a grudge against my xenophobic jokes. He has had a truly bright future cut short by such a tragic event. "His place will never be filled, nor would the Squadron wish it to be. My thoughts are with Joanne and their children Natasha, Caitlin, Liam at this sad time." Lieutenant Johnny Clayton, 1st Troop Leader, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Sergeant Jones was an outstanding soldier and an asset to any unit he worked with. I was privileged to have had him with mine. "Andy was a fiercely proud Royal Engineer and enjoyed bringing his individual skill set into our unit. He was always first to volunteer for patrols and actively sought out ways to use his knowledge to help both the soldiers around him and also the people of Afghanistan. "A professional soldier and all round great guy, he looked after the younger, less experienced members of the troop and they looked up to him. He cared deeply about the men he worked with and they returned this in abundance. "He was a proud Welshman and we would often share long hours arguing the merits of Welsh rugby. "He died doing a part of the job he loved most, getting out and getting stuck into the task. The Troop has lost a patriarch and I have lost a friend. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family." Lieutenant Rob Campbell, 2nd Troop Leader, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Sergeant Jones always seemed to be chuckling, or smiling, a great guy to simply chat to, but whatever his view on a subject it tended to be more towards the positive. "An amazingly outgoing Soldier, who took a great deal of pride in not only his job but also in the care and well being of those he commanded. "He was a character impossible to forget, and one who will be sorely missed. Warrant Officer Class 1 (Regimental Sergeant Major) Leon Mattear, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Sergeant Jones was quiet by nature, to those who didn't know him well, a keen rugby player and an active member of the Warrant Officers' and Sergeant's mess. "He was regarded very highly within Fondouk Squadron for his expertise and experience and was always on hand to help out with any engineering tasks, be it bridge laying or Counter Improvised Explosive Device countermeasures; an utterly dependable Senior Non-Commissioned Officer, an asset to the Squadron and the Regiment. "He will be deeply missed by his friends and family within the Regiment, but by no-one more so than his wife and three children; our thoughts and prayers are with them at this time of pain and sorrow." Warrant Officer Class 2 (Squadron Sergeant Major) Tony Gould, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Sergeant Andy Jones was a loyal friend and a hugely trusted Senior Non-Commissioned Officer in the Squadron. He leaves a huge void in our ranks, but we will remember him always for his stories and the banter about his homeland in Wales. "We shared many a joke and tales of his children and wife and how much he loved them. His turnout and bearing was first class and the support he gave me when needed was given with compassion and meaning. Thank you Andy; you are gone, but will never be forgotten." Staff Sergeant (Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant) Tony Round, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "Sergeant Andy Jones came to the Squadron to form part of the Operation HERRICK 12 deployment. "It was in this early period I first got to know him, not only as a member of the Squadron, but also as friend. "He would often approach me with weird and wonderful requests for engineering kit he required for his work, knowing that I did not have a clue what it was he required. It would soon transpire that he was a huge fan of ‘wind ups'. "Andy was an extremely professional soldier; although he didn't wear the Motto in his beret he was very much a Queen's Royal Lancer. I will sorely miss the rugby banter we had between our two countries. My thoughts go out to his family; his wife Joanne and his three children. "Rest in Peace brother; gone but never to be forgotten."  Staff Sergeant Nicholas Robinson, Royal Engineers, Support Headquarters Troop, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "I first met Andy Jones when we were both serving in 31 Armoured Engineer Squadron (AES), 32 Engineer Regiment. Shortly after completing the training year we went to Kosovo together. It was here that I first got to know Andy as a person. "As a young Sapper in the Squadron Andy loved the ethos of ‘work hard, play hard', especially at weekends when the Squadron bar was open. It was a good test of our friendship when England played Wales at rugby; when England won, he would sulk for about 5 seconds before getting another round of drinks. "Andy always said that 31 AES was the best Engineer Squadron he served with, the lads and the officers took a shine to him and made him feel welcome. "Our paths crossed again when Andy was posted to the Queen's Royal Lancers in January 2009. He had changed from the young Sapper I remembered to a Senior Non-Commissioned Officer, and was now also married and the proud father of two daughters and a son. "The Lancers are a family Regiment and Andy soon found his place in that family. One of the first things Andy did with the Regiment was the Regimental Troop Test exercise, a military skills competition. "Andy was part of the winning team and loved telling everyone that the team only won because they had an Engineer presence in the team. Being in the winning team also held Andy in good stead; it earned him immediate respect from his junior ranks. He was always keen to pass on his experience to the young lads. He would also listen to the lads and cared for those placed under his command. "My thoughts are now with Jo and the kids and the rest of Andy's family. "Rest in Peace mate, you will be missed by all." Sergeant Kristoffer Haystead, 5th Troop Sergeant, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "I met Andy in January 2009 when he came to the Regiment. I immediately hit it off with him because that was the type of person Andy was; he liked everyone. "No one had a bad word to say about him, he was the nicest guy you could ever meet. "As a soldier, he defined the term Engineer Reconnaissance; he was the upmost professional at all times. He was a family man and loved his wife and kids very much. "We had endless chats about our families and how we missed them, he would always listen, would never turn you away and was always there for his friends, right or wrong. What always made me smile is how he was when he got to the Regiment. Always happy always smiling, and in the mess was a real character who always made everyone he talked to smile. "Where-ever Andy was, with his crew, a member of the Squadron, or anyone else, he always looked after them and took care of them. "Loved by all the members of Fondouk Squadron, he loved them and the Regiment in return. He loved serving alongside soldiers from The Queen's Royal Lancers in what he came to call his other family. "I will miss Andy very much and am sure the whole of Fondouk Squadron and the Queen's Royal Lancers will miss him dearly." Sergeant Andy Armitage, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Light Aid Detachment, Fondouk Squadron, The Queen's Royal Lancers said: "A colleague and true friend. Knowing you was an honour. Speaking to you was inspirational. We really got to know each other a few weeks ago. That week was filled with memories of laughter. You told me that you saw REME as your brothers. And your love for your family, Thoughts go to them at this time. You will be missed mate, but never forgotten."