The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment


   Kingsman Jamie Hancock,


Kingsman Jamie Hancock, aged 19, from The 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, Killed in Basra, southern Iraq on Monday 6 November 2006.

Left ... A ceremony was held, Thursday 16 November 2006, at RAF Brize Norton to mark the repatriation of five Service personnel killed on operations in Iraq.

Kingsman Hancock died as a result of injuries sustained when he came under small arms fire whilst on sentry duty. The incident took place at approximately 1200hrs local time at the Old State Building, a Coalition Forces base in central Basra City.

Jamie Lee Hancock was born on 30 January 1987. He lived near Wigan, Lancashire, with his brother, also a serving soldier. He joined the British Army at the age of 18 and began his career at the Infantry Training Centre, Catterick. On completion of the Combat Infantryman’s Course in November 2005, he was posted to 5 Platoon, Burma Company, The 1st Battalion, The Queen’s Lancashire Regiment, serving as a Rifleman where he was involved in training to prepare other units for operations in Iraq. On 1 June 2006 Kingsman Hancock was posted to The 1st Battalion, The King’s Regiment, having volunteered for a six-month tour of Iraq as part of Catterick-based 19 Light Brigade. The Regiment amalgamated into The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment on 1 July 2006. He subsequently took part in four months of high-intensity training with Chindit Company prior to deploying to Iraq on 21 October as part of the Advance Party. Despite being a junior soldier, he had been identified by his peers and his commanders as a young man with real potential. He stood out due to his professionalism and his sheer pride in being a soldier. As a recently qualified Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle driver, Kingsman Hancock showed a natural aptitude and ability that belied his relative inexperience with the vehicle and with the challenging conditions found in southern Iraq. His Platoon will remember him fondly as an outgoing, gregarious practical joker. He was never short of anything to say, whether it was a one-liner or a kind word of encouragement. His friends knew him as a great listener and he was regarded by many as an elder-brother figure. When off duty, he was always the life and soul of the party and his friends saw him as a constant source of morale within the team. He was very much a free spirit and could always be relied upon for help or advice.

Lieutenant Colonel Simon Hutchinson MBE In his short time in the Company he made a real impression on all ranks. He will be remembered as a friend, a comrade, and an outstanding soldier. He will be sorely missed and his loss will greatly affect those who were fortunate enough to have known him. "Kingsman Jamie Hancock was a first class soldier, doing a difficult job very well, with good humour and enthusiasm. We are all proud to have known him."


Kingsman Hancock’s Company Commander, Major Chris Job, said: "It is with deep regret that I have to announce the untimely death yesterday of Kingsman Jamie Hancock. Kingsman Hancock was an energetic and enthusiastic individual who lived for the Army and had a very promising career ahead of him. Proud to be a Kingsman, he was determined to do as well as he possibly could. His enthusiasm was boundless and the fearless spirit with which he lived was amply demonstrated by his decision to volunteer for this Iraq tour. "Although young, and new to the Army, he appeared older and more experienced than his 19 years. As a Warrior driver, he was considered to be one of the best despite only recently passing his test. "He was a magnet for his peers who were drawn by his infectious sense of fun and all-embracing nature. Always at the centre of practical jokes he lived life to the full. We will best remember him for creating, whilst going through pre-deployment training, his recent ‘Hammer Time’ dance where he cajoled his mates to dance with only a field helmet covering their pride. "Our sympathy and thoughts go out to his family at this awful time; we are all deeply saddened by this tragic loss. He will be sorely missed by his many friends and the wider regimental family." Kingsman Hancock's Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Simon Hutchinson MBE, speaking from the Battalion Headquarters in Bourlon Barracks, Catterick Garrison, added: "Kingsman Jamie Hancock was a first class soldier, doing a difficult job very well, with good humour and enthusiasm. We are all proud to have known him." Kingsman Hancock was single. His family have asked the Ministry of Defence to issue the following statement on their behalf: "We are deeply shocked at the loss of our much-loved son. We are and always will be very proud of him and all that he achieved. At this difficult time, we request that our privacy be respected.

A memorial garden lovingly created in honour of her son by the mother of Wigan soldier Jamie Hancock, who was killed in action while serving in Iraq last year, will be the venue of a special garden party to raise money for the Army Benevolent Fund. [Info: 21st Aug 2007] Jamie Hancock's mother, Lynda Ledwith, (right) in the garden with Lt Col Philip Aindow, North West Regional Director of the Army Benevolent Fund

[ Lynda Ledwith ]

Lynda Ledwith has spent many months carefully planting and nurturing the garden at the back of her cottage home in Glossop, Derbyshire. Now she has decided to host a garden party, with 120 people expected to attend, which will raise money for the Army Benevolent Fund, a charity that provides practical and financial help to soldiers, former soldiers and their families in times of need: "Jamie loved the garden here and the river that runs through it. He visited the cottage just before leaving for his tour of Iraq," explained Lynda. "I wanted to create a special place in the garden, a place that would remind me of how brave Jamie was, somewhere that I could see as Jamie having come home. I hope others will visit Jamie's garden and use it as a place in which to remember Jamie." The garden has been planted with different aspects of Jamie's life in mind. Plants range from Blue Angels, "to watch over Jamie", and Dahlia Romeos, "because Jamie was a Romeo, he liked the girls!". There are also climbing red roses, the red rose being a symbol of Jamie's regiment, the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment. The plants are all red, white or blue, the colours of the Union Flag, which was draped over Jamie's coffin at his funeral service. Peace lilies symbolise Lynda's hope for peace.

[ "This garden is dedicated to Jamie Hancock. My son. My hero. The beauty of the garden reminds me of you; the tallness of the topiary reminds me of you; the flowers show their personality just like you; and I still see you swimming with the dolphins... Love you always, Mum x" ]

The garden's main features include a central dolphin fountain sculpture. Lynda explains that this reminds her of the fun Jamie had when he went swimming with the dolphins in America when he was 11. The colours of the pots in the garden are predominantly black, "Jamie liked his black T-shirts". A stone cat, "Jamie loved cats", sits on a border wall. 

Among the plants is a plaque carrying these words: "This garden is dedicated to Jamie Hancock. My son. My hero. The beauty of the garden reminds me of you; the tallness of the topiary reminds me of you; the flowers show their personality just like you; and I still see you swimming with the dolphins... Love you always, Mum x"

Lynda said: ... "Jamie will always be in my heart and I know he is in the hearts of everyone who met him. He is missed so much by many people - I know that Jamie had so many friends. Creating this garden has helped me deal with the heartache and I now want it to help others if it can. "We are having an invite-only garden party early next month (September 07) to raise money for the Army Benevolent Fund. In the future, I hope that other organisations may want to come and see it, and make a donation to the ABF. What I want to get across to people is that I think our British soldiers are the best in the world and they do a great job wherever they are in the world. They need our support. We should support our soldiers who are in Iraq and particularly those who come back with injuries, sometimes quite horrific injuries. The Army Benevolent Fund helps these Servicemen and women when they need that help the most." The garden party will include a buffet cooked by Army chefs, games for the children, an Elvis impersonator and a raffle. Lynda is keen to thank all the organisations and individuals who have lent their support, including Cheshire Building Society, Jim and Dave (the gardeners), her husband Lee, son Joe, and all her ex-work colleagues and friends who have kindly donated plants for the garden. Lieutenant Colonel Philip Aindow, North West Regional Director of the Army Benevolent Fund, said: "The work that Lynda has put into creating Jamie's garden and her support to the Army Benevolent Fund is truly inspirational. The ABF relies on the support of the community. The ABF spends about £250,000 every year in the North West alone assisting soldiers, former soldiers and their families - a considerable amount of which is raised by kind donations from the public. Soldiers appreciate that greatly." If you wish to make a donation to the Army Benevolent Fund, you can send a cheque made payable to 'Army Benevolent Fund', to: Jamie Hancock's Garden, Army Benevolent Fund North West Office, Fulwood Barracks, Preston, Lancashire PR2 8AA.


Sergeant Graham Hesketh  killed in Iraq 29 December 2006 ...

2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, following an attack on UK forces in southern Iraq on Thursday 28 December 2006.

Sergeant Hesketh, aged 35, died as a result of injuries sustained from an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) placed at a roadside in Basra City, Southern Iraq.


Sgt Hesketh was commanding a Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle on a routine security patrol. The patrol was travelling towards the Old State Building, a British Army Base in the centre of the City, when the device activated. Sgt Hesketh, sadly, died from his injuries whilst being evacuated to the Military Field Hospital at Shaiba Logistics Base. There were no other casualties. Graham Hesketh was born in Liverpool on 1 December 1971. He grew up in Runcorn in Cheshire, where he went to St Chad’s Roman Catholic School. Graham joined the British Army at the age of 17 in 1989 and served with the 1st Royal Tank Regiment in Germany for three years. He left the Army in 1992, but rejoined in March 1995 to serve with 1st Battalion The King’s Regiment, and was promoted to Lance Corporal the following year. He was promoted to Corporal in July 2002 and posted to the Infantry Training Centre Catterick where he was an instructor to infantry recruits. He returned to his Battalion and was promoted to Sergeant in January 2005. The King’s Regiment merged into The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment on 1 July 2006 and he deployed to Iraq with the 2nd Battalion on 11 November 2006, serving as a Platoon Sergeant... "Graham cared deeply about his profession, about the men in his charge and about his job here in Iraq. He was part of the backbone of this Battalion. We are proud to have known him."

 

During his time in the Army Sgt Hesketh deployed on exercises to Canada, Jordan, Kenya, and Germany and spent an attachment with 1st Battalion The King’s Own Royal Border Regiment. He had deployed on operational tours to Northern Ireland, the Former Republic of Yugoslavia and Iraq. Throughout his varied career Sgt Hesketh always embraced, and was enthused by, new challenges - no matter how difficult or diverse. He was an extremely motivated and compassionate soldier who was fiercely determined. He was committed to those under his command, was completely selfless and a very effective leader.

Professionally, Sgt Hesketh was held in high regard by all those who knew and served with him. He was an enthusiastic and highly competent Platoon Sergeant who had a keen sense of humour and was always optimistic no matter what the circumstance. He will be remembered as being a great asset to the Battalion as a whole. Off-duty he would divide himself between spending time with his close friends and giving avid support to Everton Football Club. Graham was engaged to a soldier who is also serving in Iraq. He leaves behind two children, a 7 year old girl and a 3 year old boy.

Lieutenant Colonel Simon Hutchinson,  Commanding officer of the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, said:  "Graham cared deeply about his profession, about the men in his charge and about his job here in Iraq. He was part of the backbone of this Battalion. We are proud to have known him. "He is a great loss to the Battalion and will be deeply missed by all who had the pleasure to serve with him. Our thoughts are with his family, particularly his son and daughter, and also with his fiancée." The Regimental Sergeant Major, Warrant Officer Class 1 Ian Main, said,  "Sgt Graham Hesketh cared deeply for his men, and in return they respected him. But more than that, they loved him”.  A fellow Sergeant from the Battalion, Sgt Dave Barton said of Sgt Hesketh:  "He was simply a nice bloke, and a staunch Evertonian. He wasn’t in the traditional mould of an Infantry Sergeant, but if he asked something of his men, they would always deliver."  Sergeant Graham Ramsden said:  "He was all for his lads. He was due to be posted before the end of the tour, but had asked to stay longer so he could look after his platoon." "He was all for his lads" His Officer Commanding, Major Rob Driver said:  "Sergeant Graham Hesketh’s death is a desperate loss to his family, colleagues and friends. Graham always lived life to the fullest; he was a vibrant and energetic individual whose love for life and sense of humour touched all those around him.  "He was a highly capable, professional soldier and a role model to the other soldiers within his Battalion." Sgt Hesketh's father, Kevin, has released the following tribute: "Graham was a lovely child moving from Liverpool to Runcorn with his father and Grandparents at the age of 4½. First Graham attended St Edwards School before moving to Our Lady's Junior School at the age of 7 where he became a very enthusiastic child getting involved in sporting activities including Football, Athletics and Swimming. He also served as an altar boy at Our Lady's Parish Church. "Then at the age of 11 he graduated onto Brookvale School later changing onto St Chad's High School. From an early age Graham was a very adventurous child. After leaving school at 16 Graham was concerned with no future employment as far as trade work was concerned.  "Graham had always had it in mind in joining the army enrolling at Catterick Garrison as a junior at 17½ where he then went on to serve 3 years in the tank regiment. He was a very courageous young man, serving in Germany, Ireland and Cyprus.  "After 3 years Graham left the army, but could not settle as there was no suitable work available to him. At 22 Graham re-enlisted into the army once again, serving his country in various continents until rising from Lance Corporal to Corporal. "He was a very great asset to the army, receiving his promotion to Sergeant in 2005. He found this a very challenging position but gained very much respect from his fellow colleagues while serving in this position. He was posted to Iraq in November where he and his troops dealt in various activities in a peacekeeping role. "Graham was killed in action while patrolling in Iraq by a kerbside bomb exploding under his Jeep. He will be remembered by his Family, Father, Daughter and Son, Aunts, Uncles and many Friends he made during his lifetime."


Kingsman Alexander William Green killed in Iraq in southern Iraq on Saturday 13 January 2007.

Kingsman Alex Green, aged 21, from 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, died as a result of injuries sustained earlier in the morning when shot by small arms fire whilst on a task in the Hayy Al Muhandisn District of Basra City. 

[ Kingsman Alex Green ]

Kingsman Alex Green

Kingsman Alex Green - pictured above ... As a Marine Cadet before he joined The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment


Kingsman Alex Green was serving with Chindit Company, based at the Old State Building in the centre of the City. He was part of a patrol that had been escorting a convoy out of the City and they were returning from their task when the incident happened. Kingsman Alexander William Green was born on 7 February 1985. He lived in Warrington and joined the Army at the age of 19. He leaves behind a son, Bradley, who is two years of age. On 25 October 2004, Kingsman Alex Green began his Army career at the Infantry Training Centre Catterick. On completing the Combat Infantryman’s Course in April 2005 he joined his Regiment, 1st Battalion The Queen’s Lancashire Regiment, serving in Germany. Volunteering for the deployment to Iraq, he joined 1st Battalion The King’s Regiment, prior to the Regiments' amalgamation into The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment on 1 July 2006.  He had already been identified by his colleagues and commanders as a professional soldier with real leadership and command potential. Mad about the Army he was extremely dedicated to his job and took great pride in being a soldier. This was reflected in the high standard of his soldiering, personal presentation and the maintenance of his equipment and weapon, particularly his Light Machine Gun. He was an immensely proud and devoted father who liked nothing more than to spend time with his son, Bradley. In particular, he enjoyed taking him to the park in Warrington and playing Pink Floyd songs to him on a guitar.  A full time Arsenal fan he took much delight in lively conversation with his friends in Chindit Company for supporting teams from Liverpool and Manchester, especially after Arsenal’s recent successes against them. His colleagues in Chindit Company spoke of him as someone they could share problems with and get honest friendly advice from. He spoke his mind and was respected for it. Off duty his comrades were enjoying slowly corrupting him from his clean cut military image. Hugely popular and very talented he will be remembered as a father, friend, comrade and a thoroughly professional soldier. He will be greatly missed and his loss will hugely affect those who were fortunate enough to know him. His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Simon Hutchinson MBE  (CO 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment), said: "Kingsman Alex Green was one of our most promising young soldiers. He loved what he did, and everyone respected how he did it. His determination, friendly nature and enthusiasm were a real inspiration. If you could capture in one man all that a Kingsman could hope to be, you would struggle to come closer to the mark than him." The family of Kingsman Alex Green, added: "Alex loved the Army and the services. It was all he had wanted to do. He had been a Marine Cadet and wanted to join the Marines but an injury prevented that, so he joined the Army. "He was living his dream. He was proud of being in the Army and doing his duty."


Second Lieutenant Jonathan Carlos Bracho-Cooke 13 June 1982 ... 5 February 2007

[ Second Lieutenant Jonathan Bracho-Cooke ]

Second Lieutenant Jonathan Bracho-Cooke, Aged 24, of the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment died as a result of injuries sustained by an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) attack against his patrol in the As Sarraji District of Basra City on Monday 5th February 2007

Second Lieutenant Jonathan Bracho-Cooke was serving with Chindit Company, based at the Old State Building in the centre of the city. He was commanding a patrol of Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicles, which were travelling to Basra Palace, the Headquarters of the Basra City South Battle Group, when the incident happened.

[ The coffin of Lt Bracho-Cooke was carried by regimental colleagues ]

Second Lieutenant Jonathan Bracho-Cooke was born on 13 June 1982. He lived in Hove and joined the army at the age of 22. Engaged to Laura he was due to get married in August this year.

On 8 May 2005, Second Lieutenant Jonathan Bracho-Cooke began his army career at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. On completion of his officer training and Infantry Platoon Commander's Battle Courses he reported for duty with 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, serving on operations in Basra City, southern Iraq. Second Lieutenant Bracho-Cooke had been in Iraq since the New Year and was always asking questions, trying to improve how he did business and seeking the best solutions to problems. Diligent and eager to learn, he was a very promising young officer who had a bright career ahead. He was excited about being in Iraq and proud to be leading his Kingsmen, the soldiers serving under his command. He demanded nothing but the very best from and for his Kingsmen. They in return respected him and were extremely fond of him. They saw him as a caring and compassionate leader who despite having only been in command for a relatively short time had made a huge impression on them. To a man they feel privileged and honoured to have had him as their Platoon Commander. Known as 'BC' to his friends, Second Lieutenant Bracho-Cooke's brother officers will remember him as a cheerful and friendly person who always had time for those who needed it. They particularly liked his ‘off the wall' sense of humour which manifested itself in various ways, either by keeping them up late with his antics or by waking them up with the offer of a jaffa cake.  He was devoted to his fiancée Laura and whilst others discussed buying new cars and going on holidays on their return to the UK, he would talk passionately about wedding plans and spending quality time with her. Hugely talented and extremely popular he will be remembered as a loving fiancé, talented officer, comrade and friend. Second Lieutenant Chris Ibbotson, who went through training and joined the Regiment with Second Lieutenant Jonathan Bracho-Cooke, said: "He was faultless; the nicest guy you could hope to meet. His sense of humour was key to who he was. He was fit too and a better runner than most, no matter how many cigarettes he smoked." His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Simon Hutchinson MBE (CO 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment), said: "Jonathan Bracho-Cooke was a fine young platoon commander who had quickly established himself under very difficult conditions. He really stood out as a bright, enthusiastic and charismatic officer. We are very proud that he chose to be one of us, and are desperately sad to have lost him."


Kingsman Wilson, aged 28, of the 2nd Battalion,  The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, died as a result of injuries sustained during a patrol in Basra City on 1 April 2007.

Kingsman Wilson was conducting a security patrol close to Basra Palace when his patrol came under fire. He had dismounted from his Warrior vehicle to check the roadside ahead for explosive devices when he was hit by small arms fire. Despite being given immediate first aid at the scene, tragically he died of his injuries.

Kingsman Danny John Wilson From Workington and a proud Cumbrian, Kingsman Danny John Wilson was born on 5 August 1978. He first joined the Lancastrian and Cumbrian Volunteers (TA) and then in July 2005, the 1st Battalion, The Kings Own Royal Border Regiment. He served with his Battalion in Iraq in 2006 and then volunteered to deploy once again with the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, where he joined CHINDIT Company in early March this year. A popular and much respected soldier, Kingsman Wilson's enthusiasm and infectious sense of humour soon marked him out as a Battalion character. One of the older and more experienced Kingsman in his platoon, he was well known for giving others a hand and ensuring that new members of the platoon soon settled in. He was widely respected and much admired within his Company, and was always ready to put his experience and training into practice by volunteering for difficult tasks. Already identified by his commanders and peers as a future NCO, Kingsman Wilson showed the will and aptitude to succeed in all that he did. Captain Steve Metcalfe, of CHINDIT Company, said of Kingsman Wilson: "I knew him to be a professional soldier who was keen to do his job. His willingness to return to an operational theatre is testament to his commitment to those he served with." Danny was a loving husband to Tracey and devoted father to his son Leo. He spoke of his young family often and of their plans for next year, when the Battalion will deploy to Cyprus. His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Mark Kenyon MBE, said: "Danny Wilson was the sort of Kingsman whom it is a privilege to serve alongside. Selfless, committed and always ready to look on the bright side, he will be sorely missed. Our thoughts are very much with his family at this time."


[ Kingsman Adam Smith ]

Kingsman Adam Smith, killed in Iraq 6th April 2007, of the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, was 19 years old and came from the Isle of Man. Raised in Liverpool and a proud Everton fan, he joined the Army in April 2004, and on completion of his combat infantryman training he joined the 1st Battalion The King’s Regiment, his local Regiment. In 2006 he was selected to join the Reconnaissance Platoon of the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment following which he deployed to Basra, Iraq, in November 2006.

Kingsman Adam Smith was a popular and highly respected colleague. Cheerful with a happy-go-lucky attitude he had recently graduated from Rifleman to the Gunner's seat where his recent training was put to good effect. He was known for his dependable and courageous attitude, soldiering with his fellow Reconnaissance Platoon Kingsmen on foot, in helicopters and in Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicles. His coolness under pressure had already marked him out as a Kingsman of considerable potential. Colour Sergeant Skelton, of the Reconnaissance Platoon, said of him: "Kingsman Adam Smith was such a big character, always had a smile on his face and a sparkle in his big blue eyes. For such a young man he was a very talented soldier with a bright future in the Armed Forces. This is a tragic loss both to all his friends in the Recce Platoon and 2 LANCS. We send our deepest condolences to his family and all his friends in Liverpool." Kingsman Bird, of the Reconnaissance Platoon, added: "Adam was a good mate to me, it was like we were attached at the hip. His loss was tragic to me and the rest of our mates from the Regiment. He died doing the job he loved and was good at. I will never forget him. "Always thinking of you Smudge lad, Birdy." Captain Mike Peel, of the Reconnaissance Platoon, also paid tribute to Kingsman Smith: "Kingsman Smith was a soldier with an irrepressible sense of humour. He was thoroughly popular throughout the Battalion and especially in the Reconnaissance Platoon, where his cheerful nature marked him out as a constant source of morale and strength in times of difficulty. He will be sorely  missed by all who had the honour to serve alongside him."  Kingsman Smith's Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Mark Kenyon MBE, said:  "Kingsman Adam Smith showed all the qualities of a reconnaissance soldier, dependable, determined and a real team player he was a popular and respected member of his platoon and this Battlegroup. Our thoughts are very much with his family, particularly his Mother, at this time." The family of Kingsman Adam (Smudge) Smith issued the following statement: "This was the hardest thing we have ever had to do, it just doesn’t seem real and no amount of words can describe how much we are hurting. We keep thinking, hoping it’s not real and at any moment we will wake up form this nightmare. "Adam was the most wonderful and beautiful person anyone could wish to meet, he always had a smile on his face and loved life so much, he had everything to live for. He was the most popular person you could ever know, everyone loved him and he has left so many broken hearts behind him.  He was a loving son, brother and the best boyfriend in the whole world and he will be missed more than words can say. He will forever be in our hearts. "Adam our Hero our Star."


Kingsman Alan Joseph Jones, aged 20, of the 2nd Battalion  The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, was killed in Basra on 23 April 2007. Kingsman Jones was a Minimi Gunner conducting 'top-cover' from a Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle when his Platoon came under small-arms fire in the Al Ashar District of Central Basra City. He was injured during the incident and despite his colleagues' best efforts to save his life, he sadly died of his injuries.

[ Kingsman Alan Joseph Jones ]

[ Kingsman Alan Joseph Jones ]

Kingsman Jones was born on 23 August 1986 in Liverpool. He joined the Army on 14 August 2003, and following his training joined his local Regiment, the 1st Battalion, The King's Regiment. Due to his considerable strengths as a soldier he was selected for the Reconnaissance Platoon in mid 2005. After the Regiment's amalgamation with the King's Own Border Regiment and Queen's Lancashire Regiment in July 2006 his Battalion became the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment. He subsequently deployed to Iraq with the Battalion on 11 November 2006 on Operation TELIC 9. Kingsman Jones was a popular, dependable soldier and is remembered throughout the Battalion as being a strong and instantly likeable character. A professional soldier, he frequently deployed with his colleagues on operations and in a variety of roles; by armoured vehicle, helicopter and by boat. He was a staunch Everton fan and keen footballer. He leaves behind his family including his mother, Julie, younger brother, Reese, and girlfriend Lauren. Captain Mike Peel of the Reconnaissance Platoon said this of him: "I knew Kingsman Jones to be a soldier with an appetite for soldiering at the sharp end. An honest, experienced and robust character, he was always willing to assist others in whatever way he could. He will be sorely missed by all who had the honour to serve alongside him."  Lance Corporal Traynor said, on behalf of the Reconnaissance Platoon: 'Jonesy' was a character in the Recce Platoon that was a joy to be around. He was the soul of the Platoon, and always liked to be the centre of attention. He will be missed by everyone, especially the Recce Platoon." Lieutenant Colonel Mark Kenyon, his Commanding Officer, said: "Kingsman Jones will be remembered as a very professional soldier who was loyal to his Regiment and his friends. Above all he was a cheerful and likeable young man who always had time to help others. He was the epitome of all a Kingsman should be. Our thoughts and prayers are very much with his family at this time."